Radiology Grand Rounds Lecture Series

Duke Radiology Grand Rounds Lectures are conducted on Thursdays at 7:30 a.m.- 8:30 a.m. in Room 2002 Duke North. The mission for Radiology Grand Rounds is to provide an educational format which has a broad appeal to faculty and trainees. If you have any further questions regarding Radiology Grand Rounds, please contact Debbie Griffin at 919-684-7228.

LI-RADS: Past, Present, and Future

September 14, 2017 7:30 a.m. Duke North Room 2002

LI-RADS is a system for standardized imaging of the liver in patients with HCC. The recent update in 2017 addresses imaging technique, terminology, interpretation, and reporting using US, contrast-enhanced ultrasound, CT, and MRI for surveillance, diagnosis, staging, and treatment response assessment. This lecture briefly reviews the history of LI-RADS and discusses LI-RADS present (focusing on CT and MRI) as well as changes introduced in version 2017. It concludes with a glimpse into LI-RADS future directions.

Claude B. Sirlin, M.D.

Professor of Radiology, University of California, San Diego

Claude B. Sirlin, MD, is a clinician scientist who specializes in liver imaging, metabolic imaging and imaging of abdominal cancers. He founded and directs UC San Diego Health’s Liver Imaging Group, which actively collaborates with hepatologists, surgeons, pathologists and statisticians to advance screening, diagnosis, treatment and outcomes of individuals with liver disease. He is also the co-director of the Cancer Imaging Program at Moores Cancer Center, chair of the Liver Imaging Reporting and Data System Committee for the American College of Radiology, and co-director of the Radiologist Clinician-Scientist Training Program in his university. His research interests include MRI imaging of liver cancer and liver disease. He has published more than 200 peer-reviewed articles and is a reviewer for multiple radiology journals.

How We Do Science at Duke

September 21, 2017 7:30 a.m. Duke North Room 2002

Research is an integral part of academic medicine. It has been particularly prominent in radiology, motivated by its strong technological backbone, its rapid progress, and the expected scientific expertise of its practitioners, creating a need and expectation for continued investment in the science of radiology. Informed by diverse expertise across clinical and basic strengths of the department (with additional participation of Rendon Nelson, Jay Baker, Joseph Lo, and Donald Frush), this Grand Rounds aims to delineate the features of excellence in the practice of science in radiology. Topics covered include the not-so-commonly-disclosed insights and effective models of inquiry and collaboration. We discuss how we move from a possible idea to a project concept, specific aims, study design, resource identification (technical, clinical, statistical), experiments, interpretations of the data, grants, papers, etc, with the objective of encouraging a higher degree of consciousness and intentionality in the process.

Ehsan Samei, PhD, DABR, FAAPM, FSPIE, FAIMBE

Director of Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, NC

Dr. Ehsan Samei, PhD, DABR, FAAPM, FSPIE, FAIMBE is a tenured Professor of Radiology, Medical Physics, Biomedical Engineering, Physics, and Electrical and Computer Engineering at Duke University, where he serves as the Director of the Duke Medical Physics Graduate Program and the Clinical Imaging Physics Group. His interests and expertise include x-ray imaging, theoretical imaging models, simulation methods, and experimental techniques in medical image formation, analysis, assessment, and perception.

His research includes methods to develop image quality and dose metrics that are clinically relevant and that can be used to design and utilize advanced imaging techniques towards optimum interpretive and quantitative performance. He further has an active interest in bridging the gap between scientific scholarship and clinical practice, in the meaningful realization of translational research, and in clinical processes that are informed by scientific evidence. Those include advanced imaging performance characterization, procedural optimization, and radiomics in retrospective clinical dose and quality analytics. He has published 226 referred papers and been the recipient of 33 grants totaling $13M of extramural funding.

Showing the Value of Imaging: What Do New Payment Programs Mean for Radiology?

September 28, 2017 7:30 a.m. Duke North Room 2002

Medicare, Medicaid, and private insurers are all trying new ways to pay for health care, with the goal of tying payments to better quality and value. New laws have changed the formula Medicare uses to pay physicians, and private insurers are similarly rolling out new bundled payments, accountable care organizations, and other approaches. While these new payment models are intended to remove barriers to delivering high quality, coordinated care, the pace of change is intense. The goal of this talk is to review the current state of value-based payment programs (including the many acronyms thrown around, like MACRA, MIPS, APMs, ACPs, and VBP), what the future holds, how these models affect radiologists, and how radiologists can succeed under them.

Robert Saunders, PhD

Research Director, Payment and Delivery Reform, Duke - Margolis Center for Health Policy; Durham, NC

Dr. Saunders is Research Director, Payment and Delivery Reform at Duke-Margolis In this role, he manages the Center’s portfolio for payment and delivery reform initiatives, including bringing together faculty from across the University for developing the strategic vision in this area. He also leads specific projects in digital health technologies, evaluation of new payment policies, and federal physician payment reforms.
Prior to joining Duke-Margolis, Dr. Saunders was a Senior Director and then Senior Advisor to the President of the National Quality Forum, where he managed a large federally-funded project that provided recommendations on more than 200 quality measures for 20 different federal programs. As Senior Advisor, he directed special projects on topics including data, payment reform, systems engineering, and future of healthcare quality measurement. There, he authored targeted communications to translate the organization’s technical work for a broad audience, including journal perspectives, white papers, and blogs and supported the development of new funding opportunities, including developing relationships with foundations and authoring concept papers and proposals. He was previously Senior Program Officer at the Institute of Medicine and managed health care legislative affairs for Representative Rush D. Holt.

Morbidity & Mortality

October 5, 2017 7:30 a.m. Duke North Room 2002

Department of Radiology Morbidity & Mortality, moderated by Don Frush, M.D., FACR, FAAP

Donald P. Frush, MD., FACR, FAAP

John Strohbehn Professor of Radiology, Professor of Pediatrics, vice chair for safety and quality, faculty member of the Medical Physics Graduate Program, and Medical Director of the Duke Medical Radiation Center, Duke University, Durham, NC

Research interests are predominantly focused on pediatric body CT, including technology assessment, techniques for pediatric MDCT examinations, assessment of image quality, and CT radiation dosimetry, dose reduction, and radiation risk communication. International affiliations include the WHO, International Society of Radiology, and IAEA. Dr. Frush is currently a board member of the Society for Pediatric Radiology and National Council of Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP), Chair of the Image Gently Alliance, Chair of the Board of Trustees ABR, and a fellow of SCBT MR.

Future for Machine Learning Applied to Thyroid Nodules and ACR TI-RADS

October 19, 2017 7:30 a.m. Duke North Room 2002

This talk will discuss ongoing research within the Duke Department of Radiology regarding machine learning and thyroid nodules. Topics will include an exploration of current challenges with thyroid nodule imaging and what makes thyroid nodules an appealing target for machine learning, how machine learning might improve thyroid imaging and thyroid ultrasound reporting, and what technical challenges our team faces as we work towards our goal of improving both diagnosis and report consistency

Jenny K. Hoang, MBBS

Associate Professor of Radiology and Radiation Oncology and Director of Head and Neck Imaging, Duke University, Durham, NC

Dr. Jenny K. Hoang is an Associate Professor of Radiology and Radiation Oncology and Director of Head and Neck Imaging.  Her research interest is in thyroid imaging. After humble beginnings with a few retrospective studies at Duke on incidental thyroid nodules, she ended up leading the ACR Incidental Thyroid Findings committee and was the first author of the committee’s white paper. She was then recruited on the ACR TI-RADS committee and was part of a subcommittee who developed the initial ACR TI-RADS drafts. She serves on the National Cancer Institute PDQ Screening and Prevention Editorial Board and was a lead author on the new thyroid section. She has published more than 110 peer-reviewed articles. Dr. Hoang was the recipient of GE-Radiology Research Academic Fellowship (GERRAF) Program (2010-2012) and ACR Innovations Grant (2017). She is a popular a faculty lecturer at national and international meetings. She is also actively educating and advocating on Twitter. Connect with her at @JennyKHoang.

Maciej A. Mazurowski, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Radiology and Electrical & Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC.

Dr. Maciej A. Mazurowski is an Associate Professor of Radiology and Electrical & Computer Engineering. He leads a research laboratory that focuses on applications of machine learning (including deep learning) to medicine with particular focus on cancer imaging biomarkers, radiogenomics, and radiology education. His group was among the first to demonstrate that algorithmically-assessed features of breast and brain tumors are indicative of the cancer genomic composition. Dr. Mazurowski has received funding as the principal investigator from the NIH, DOD, RSNA, NCBC, and industry. On Twitter: @mamazurowski. Lab website: http://deckard.duhs.duke.edu/~mazurowski/

Benjamin Wildman-Tobriner

Fellow, Abdominal Imaging, Duke University, Durham, NC

Ben Wildman-Tobriner is a current fellow in Abdominal Imaging Division of Radiology. His research interests include structured reporting, quality improvement, and most recently machine learning.

Overview of the Faculty Mentoring Programs within the School of Medicine

October 26, 2017 7:30 a.m. Duke North Room 2002

This presentation will provide an overview of services that are offered to Duke Faculty, through the Office for Faculty Mentoring. These offerings compliment the outstanding programs that are offered through the Office for Faculty, under the leadership of Dean Ann Brown. The Office for Faculty (Research) Mentoring was formed in 2011, in response to: 1) a documented need to assist junior faculty to be more competitive in the grant market and 2) the goal of retaining the best research oriented faculty at Duke.

Mark Dewhirst, DVM, PhD.

Gustavo S. Montana Professor of Radiation Oncology, Vice Director for Basic Sciences, DCI and Associate Dean for Faculty Mentoring, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC

A native of Manhattan, Kansas, Dr. Dewhirst received his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree and PhD degrees from Colorado State University. He joined Duke in 1984 when he was recruited to set up a multidisciplinary hyperthermia research program. Dewhirst has spent more than 30 years studying causes of tumor hypoxia, angiogenesis and the use of hyperthermia to treat cancer. In collaboration with the Pratt School of Engineering he developed a novel thermally sensitive drug carrying liposome, which has been successfully translated to Phase III human clinical trials.
He has more than 600 peer-reviewed publications, book chapters and reviews with over 29,000 citations and an H-index of 86. He is most proud of the nearly 70 mentees he has had the privilege of mentoring in his career.

The Role of Peptide Receptor Radiotherapy (PRRT) in Neuroendocrine Tumors

November 9, 2017 7:30 a.m. Duke North Room 2002

For the past two decades, development of radiolabeled SSAs has allowed for delivery of radionuclides to somatostatin-receptor (SSTR) expressing tumors. The NETTER-1 trial, an international, randomized phase III study, demonstrated the efficacy of PRRT in advanced Midgut NETs. This talk will review the risks and benefits of treatment with radiolabeled SSAs, and discuss the role of PRRT within the context of other systemic NET treatments.

Jonathan Strosberg, MD

Associate Professor of Medical Oncology & Hematology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center; Tampa, FL

Dr. Jonathan Strosberg is an associate professor at the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, specializing in management of gastrointestinal and neuroendocrine malignancies. He leads the neuroendocrine tumor division at Moffitt and heads the gastrointestinal department research program. He also serves as chair of the scientific review committee.
Dr. Strosberg has published over 100 articles on the diagnosis and management of neuroendocrine malignancies in the New England Journal of Medicine, Lancet, Journal of Clinical Oncology, Annals of Oncology, Annals of Surgery, Cancer, and other major journals, and has written twelve articles for UptoDate. He is a recipient of the National Cancer Institute’s Clinical Investigator Team Leadership Award. He serves on the board of directors of the North American Neuroendocrine Tumor Society (NANETS), on the neuroendocrine guidelines committee of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN), and on the neuroendocrine task force of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the neuroendocrine staging committee of the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC).

3D Printing

November 16, 2017 7:30 a.m. Duke North Room 2002

3D printing is a disruptive technology that has transformed care at The Mayo Clinic over the last 11 years. Additive manufacturing/3D printing started in industrial manufacturing and has quickly spread to medical applications. While not a new technology, it is being applied in new ways. This talk will focus on surgical and educational applications of 3D printing models as well as the regulatory environment and current challenges of in hospital medical 3D printing.

Jonathan M. Morris, M.D.

Assistant Professor of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology, Mayo Clinic.

Jonathan M. Morris, M.D. is co-director of the 3D Printing/Anatomic Modeling Laboratory at Mayo Clinic, which produces over 700 anatomic models per year for complex surgical and multidisciplinary patient care, presurgical simulations, custom device creation, and medical and patient education.  Dr. Morris is an international leader within the field focusing on research, educational, clinical, and forensic applications of this disruptive technology. He has co-developed the only CME course for physicians dedicated to 3D printing.

Dr. Morris is also Assistant Professor of Radiology in the Division of Neuroradiology at Mayo Clinic where he specializes in diagnostic neuroradiology, diagnosis and treatment of CSF hypotension, and minimally invasive spine procedures. He has pioneered several techniques related to cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation of tumors involving the spine, sacrum, and head and neck.

Morbidity & Mortality

December 14, 2017 7:30 a.m. Duke North Room 2002

Department of Radiology Morbidity & Mortality, moderated by Don Frush, M.D., FACR

Donald P. Frush, M.D., FACR, FAAP

John Strohbehn Professor of Radiology, Professor of Pediatrics, vice chair for safety and quality, faculty member of the Medical Physics Graduate Program, and Medical Director of the Duke Medical Radiation Center, Duke University, Durham, NC

Research interests are predominantly focused on pediatric body CT, including technology assessment, techniques for pediatric MDCT examinations, assessment of image quality, and CT radiation dosimetry, dose reduction, and radiation risk communication. International affiliations include the WHO, International Society of Radiology, and IAEA. Dr. Frush is currently a board member of the Society for Pediatric Radiology and National Council of Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP), Chair of the Image Gently Alliance, Chair of the Board of Trustees ABR, and a fellow of SCBT MR.