Radiology Grand Rounds Lecture Series

Duke Radiology Grand Rounds Lectures are conducted on Thursdays at 7:30 a.m.- 8:30 a.m. in Room 2002 Duke North. The mission for Radiology Grand Rounds is to provide an educational format which has a broad appeal to faculty and trainees. If you have any further questions regarding Radiology Grand Rounds, please contact Debbie Griffin at 919-684-7228.

 2019-2020 Fall Schedule

The Future of AI in Radiology

September 12, 2019 7:30 a.m. Duke North Room 2002

The sophistication of artificial intelligence has exploded in recent years, as have its potential applications.   Most believe the impact will be felt across a diverse set of industries, including medicine, and particularly radiology.  What will this mean for our profession?  Will it impact our labor market?  Will it change the radiologist’s job?   Who would be held responsible for medical errors?  We aim to discuss these and other topics with panelists with wide areas expertise spanning computer science, economics, and philosophy.

Vincent Conitzer, PhD, MS

Kimberly J. Jenkins University Professor of New Technologies Professor of Computer Science, Professor of Economics, and Professor of Philosophy Levine Science Research Center Box 90129, Duke University Durham, NC 27708

Vincent Conitzer is the Kimberly J. Jenkins University Professor of New Technologies and Professor of Computer Science, Professor of Economics, and Professor of Philosophy at Duke University. He received Ph.D. (2006) and M.S. (2003) degrees in Computer Science from Carnegie Mellon University, and an A.B. (2001) degree in Applied Mathematics from Harvard University. Conitzer works on artificial intelligence (AI). Much of his work has focused on AI and game theory, for example designing algorithms for the optimal strategic placement of defensive resources. More recently, he has started to work on AI and ethics: how should we determine the objectives that AI systems pursue, when these objectives have complex effects on various stakeholders?

Conitzer has received the Social Choice and Welfare Prize, a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), the IJCAI Computers and Thought Award, an NSF CAREER award, the inaugural Victor Lesser dissertation award, an honorable mention for the ACM dissertation award, and several awards for papers and service at the AAAI and AAMAS conferences. He has also been named a Guggenheim Fellow, a Kavli Fellow, a Bass Fellow, a Sloan Fellow, a AAAI Fellow, and one of AI’s Ten to Watch. He has served as program and/or general chair of the AAAI, AAMAS, AIES, COMSOC, and EC conferences. Conitzer and Preston McAfee were the founding Editors-in-Chief of the ACM Transactions on Economics and Computation (TEAC).

Walter Sinnott-Armstrong, Ph.D.

Chauncey Stillman Professor of Practical Ethics in the Department of Philosophy and the Kenan Institute for Ethics at Duke University
Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience (secondary appointment), Duke University

Walter Sinnott-Armstrong is Chauncey Stillman Professor of Practical Ethics in the Department of Philosophy and the Kenan Institute for Ethics at Duke University. He holds secondary appointments in Duke’s Law School, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Institute for Brain Science, and Centers for Cognitive Neuroscience and Interdisciplinary Decision Sciences. He has published widely on ethics, empirical moral psychology and neuroscience, epistemology, informal logic, and philosophy of law, religion, and psychiatry. His current work focuses political polarization, moral artificial intelligence, free will and moral responsibility, and various topics in moral psychology and brain science.

Where We Go Wrong: GU Imaging Pitfalls

September 19, 2019 7:30 a.m. Duke North Room 2002

Diagnostic errors in Genitourinary Radiology can arise from a number of different factors. Some are patient-related, such as motion; others relate to imaging systems, such as phases of contrast administration; and yet others relate to how we interpret images, such as region of interest placement, visualization of pathology in different imaging planes, or the use of variable window and level settings. Additionally, while many imaging findings are sensitive and specific for certain diagnoses, they can occasionally lead us astray. After a brief review of common causes of imaging “misses,” the presentation will encompass common and less common pitfalls in interpretation of pathologies of the adrenal, kidney, urothelium, retroperitoneum, and pelvis.

Dr. Erick M. Remer, MD FACR FSAR

Professor of Radiology and Director of Abdominal Imaging Research in the Section of Abdominal Imaging in the Imaging Institute at the Cleveland Clinic

Dr. Erick M. Remer, MD FACR FSAR is Professor of Radiology and Director of Abdominal Imaging Research in the Section of Abdominal Imaging in the Imaging Institute at the Cleveland Clinic. He completed his undergraduate and medical degrees at the University of Michigan, a transitional internship at Henry Ford Hospital, and residency and was Chief Resident at Northwestern University. He then returned to Ann Arbor to complete a fellowship in Computed Body Tomography, MRI, and Ultrasound.
Dr. Remer is actively involved in many of Radiological organizations and has served as Chair of the GU Scientific Program Committees for the RSNA and ARRS, as a member of the Education Program Committee and Annual Meeting Council Advisory Board of the Society of Abdominal Radiology, and was Specialty Chair of the ACR Appropriateness Criteria expert panel on Urological Imaging. He was named the SAR Igor Laufer Visiting Professor for 2018-2019. He is currently a member of a number of committees for ACR, ARRS, and SAR and participates on interdisciplinary committees with ACEP and the AUA. Dr. Remer is Director of Abdominal Imaging Research at the Cleveland Clinic and his interests lie predominantly in the area of Genitourinary Imaging. He has participated in 165 peer-reviewed publications, 160 abstract presentations, and 133 invited presentations including three named lectures.

History of Medicine in Durham

September 26, 2019 7:30 a.m. Duke North Room 2002

In this lecture, Dr. Baker will draw on his project on the history of health in Durham to provide examples of how history is critical to addressing health in three ways. First, it deepens our understanding of the structural roots of health disparities. Second, it makes visible the ways in which communities have not simply been victims of these structural forces, but have pushed back through advocacy and activism. And third, it illuminates Duke Health’s complex relationship to its community.

Jeffrey P. Baker, MD, PhD

Professor of Pediatrics and History
Director, Trent Center for Bioethics, Humanities, and History of Medicine
Duke University School of Medicine

Dr Jeffrey Baker directs the Trent Center for Bioethics, Humanities, and History of Medicine at Duke University School of Medicine. His scholarship has focused on the history of premature infant care, vaccines, autism, and child health. With a background in both pediatrics and medical history, Dr. Baker has given many lectures on the history of Duke’s health system and its surrounding community. With support from a Bass Connections grant, he has recently collaborated with Durham’s Bull City 150 Project and a team of Duke students to produce an exhibition, “Documenting Durham’s Health History: Understanding the Roots of Disparities in the City of Medicine.”

Morbidity & Mortality Conference

October 10, 2019 7:30 a.m. Duke North Room 2002

Closed Meeting

Tracy A. Jaffe, MD

Professor of Radiology
Vice Chair, Clinical Affairs
Vice Chair, Quality and Safety

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Reflections on Race and Medicine

October 17, 2019 7:30 a.m. Duke North Room 2002
Damon S. Tweedy, MD

Medical Director, Primary Care-Mental Health Integration Team, Staff Psychiatrist, Mental Health Service Line - DURHAM VETERANS AFFAIRS HEALTH CARE SYSTEM, Durham, NC
Associate Professor, Department of Psychiatry, DUKE UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER, Durham, NC

Damon Tweedy, MD is an associate professor of psychiatry. He graduated from Duke medical school in 2000 and subsequently graduated from Yale Law School in 2003 before returning to Duke to complete his medical and psychiatric training in 2007. He then joined the faculty in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences.

Dr. Tweedy divides his time between the Durham VA Health Care System and Duke. Within the VA system, he directs a team of mental health providers working in integrated primary care clinics. At the medical school, he teaches a behavioral health course for second-year primary care track students during their outpatient clinic rotations. He is also a small group leader for the Clinical Skills Foundation course, which introduces students to basic and advanced aspects of the doctor-patient relationship.

Dr. Tweedy has published articles about race and medicine in JAMA and The Annals of Internal Medicine. He has also reviewed several books for the policy-oriented journal Health Affairs. His op-eds and other book reviews have appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Chicago Tribune, and other print publications. His 2015 book: “Black Man in a White Coat: A Doctor’s Reflections on Race and Medicine” explores the intersection of race and medicine through the lens of his experience as a medical student, medical intern, and psychiatry resident. The book was a New York Times Bestseller and was selected by TIME magazine as one of the top ten nonfiction books of 2015

Advances in management of portal and mesenteric venous disease

October 24, 2019 7:30 a.m. Duke North Room 2002

“Portal and mesenteric venous disease leads to a wide spectrum of pathologies including gastrointestinal bleeding, ascites, bowel ischemia, and hepatic encephalopathy. Interventional radiologists play a key role in the management of portal and mesenteric venous disease through transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) creation and other related procedures. This talk will highlight the Duke Interventional Radiology Division’s new imaging tools and procedural techniques for portal vein access, research on patient selection and post procedure management after TIPS, and expanding use of TIPS alternatives such as balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration of gastric varices, portal vein recanalization, and splenic volume reduction.”

James Ronald, MD, PhD

Assistant Professor, Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Duke University Medical Center

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Alzheimer’s Disease: Can Neuroimaging Help Find a Cure?

October 31, 2019 7:30 a.m. Duke North Room 2002

Dr. Petrella is Professor of Radiology, Senior Fellow in the Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development, and Director of the Alzheimer’s Imaging Research Laboratory at Duke. He also serves as core faculty in the Duke-UNC Brain Imaging and Analysis Center and Duke Medical Physics Graduate Program. His work for the past 20 years has focused on applications of imaging and other biomarkers to studies of aging, mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer’s disease. He has received over 2 million dollars in grant funding from private foundations, government and industry, including the Radiological Society of North America and the National Institutes of Health as principle investigator. His studies have contributed to the development of fMRI biomarkers for MCI and aided understanding of the structural and functional underpinnings of cognitive impairment in early Alzheimer’s disease. His study evaluating the relationship between amyloid protein deposition and the Alzheimer’s structural connectome was selected as the winner of the 2015 Alexander R. Margulis Award for Scientific Excellence from the RSNA. Dr. Petrella is Past President of the American Society of Functional Neuroradiology and co-chair of Quantitative Imaging Biomarker Alliance fMRI subcommittee. He has lead national efforts to develop new fMRI tools, and standardize acquisition and analyses techniques. He is the lead author of the first study to examine the effectiveness of fMRI for pre-surgical planning in brain tumor patients. This study was used by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid as evidence for approving reimbursement for fMRI.

Jeffrey R. Petrella, MD

Professor of Radiology Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology
Director, Alzheimer’s Disease Imaging Research Laboratory
Core Faculty, Duke Brain Imaging and Analysis Center
Faculty, Medical Physics Graduate Program
Senior Fellow, Center for the Study of Aging
Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC

Dr. Petrella is Professor of Radiology, Senior Fellow in the Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development, and Director of the Alzheimer’s Imaging Research Laboratory at Duke. He also serves as core faculty in the Duke-UNC Brain Imaging and Analysis Center and Duke Medical Physics Graduate Program. His work for the past 20 years has focused on applications of imaging and other biomarkers to studies of aging, mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer’s disease. He has received over 2 million dollars in grant funding from private foundations, government and industry, including the Radiological Society of North America and the National Institutes of Health as principle investigator. His studies have contributed to the development of fMRI biomarkers for MCI and aided understanding of the structural and functional underpinnings of cognitive impairment in early Alzheimer’s disease. His study evaluating the relationship between amyloid protein deposition and the Alzheimer’s structural connectome was selected as the winner of the 2015 Alexander R. Margulis Award for Scientific Excellence from the RSNA. Dr. Petrella is Past President of the American Society of Functional Neuroradiology and co-chair of Quantitative Imaging Biomarker Alliance fMRI subcommittee. He has lead national efforts to develop new fMRI tools, and standardize acquisition and analyses techniques. He is the lead author of the first study to examine the effectiveness of fMRI for pre-surgical planning in brain tumor patients. This study was used by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid as evidence for approving reimbursement for fMRI