Radiology Grand Rounds Lecture Series

Duke Radiology Grand Rounds Lectures are conducted on Thursdays at 7:30 a.m.- 8:30 a.m. in Room 2002 Duke North. The mission for Radiology Grand Rounds is to provide an educational format which has a broad appeal to faculty and trainees. If you have any further questions regarding Radiology Grand Rounds, please contact Debbie Griffin at 919-684-7228.

Mentorship: Expanding the Definition and Goals

January 11, 2018 7:30 a.m. Duke North Room 2002

Mentorship plays a critical role in professional growth and should enhance career development, provide psychological support, coaching, and role modeling. During her talk, Dr. Jaffe will discuss the impact mentorship has on work culture and job satisfaction and address some of the limitations of traditional mentorships, processes to remedy those limitations, and thoughts about the future of mentorship in the Department of Radiology.

Tracy A. Jaffe, M.D.

Associate Professor of Radiology, Division Chief, Abdominal Imaging, Vice Chair of Safety and Quality, Department of Radiology, Duke University, Durham, NC

Tracy Jaffe is a radiologist and Vice Chair of Quality and Safety in the Department of Radiology. She is an Associate Professor with Tenure, and has been a clinical faculty member at Duke since completing her fellowship in Abdominal Imaging in 2002. She served as the Abdominal Imaging Fellowship Director from 2006 – 2012, and since 2012 has served as the Abdominal Imaging Division Chief. Her research interests include inflammatory bowel disease and CT dose reduction. She is a member of the Duke Health System Pharmacy and Medication Management Committee and the Duke University Hospital Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee. She is a Fellow of the Society of Abdominal Radiology.

Starting a Silicon Valley Tech Company to Help Patients: The How, Why and What

January 18, 2018 7:30 a.m. Duke North Room 2002

Dr. Rusty Hofmann will share how physicians can leverage their experience in clinical practice to start a meaningful company. From the first steps of identifying the mission and founding the company to scaling the business. Dr. Hofmann will describe what Grand Rounds aims to achieve for its over 3.5 million covered members, demonstrated through a relevant patient case and walking through the patient and expert product experience. He will share how he started the company and the lessons he has learned along the way.

Lawrence "Rusty" Hofmann, MD

Professor of Radiology, Stanford School of Medicine

Dr. Hofmann co-founded Grand Rounds with the goal of ensuring that access to state-of-the-art care is available to everyone. He is Chief of Interventional Radiology at Stanford Hospital and a Professor of Radiology at the Stanford School of Medicine. Dr. Hofmann presents at the leading health care conferences for industry thought leaders including: TEDMED, the Oliver Wyman Innovation Summit and Stanford MedX. A nationally recognized deep venous thrombosis (DVT) expert, Dr. Hofmann has published over 100 articles on acute and chronic DVT, peripheral arterial disease, and interventional oncology. He has held develop and bring a number of medical devices to market that are now used worldwide. Dr. Hofmann has a BS in Biology from University of Illinois and an MD from Ohio State University College of Medicine, and he did his residency at Johns Hopkins where he was Chief Resident.

Building a Community Division: Our Experience

January 25, 2018 7:30 a.m. Duke North Room 2002

In 2014, Duke Radiology organized a Community Division based in Wake County. Three years later, the Community Division has nearly doubled in faculty with impressive interval volume growth. We will discuss the origins and initial goals ofthe Division. We will outline the Division’s operational model and compare it with those of other academic radiology departments. The Division’s successes and challenges to date will be reviewed. Our discussion will conclude with some thoughts on the future of Duke Radiology in Wake County.

Ted D. Boyse, MD

Assistant Professor of Radiology, Division Chief, Community Radiology, Musculoskeletal Imaging, Duke Raleigh Hospital, Department of Radiology, Duke University, Durham, NC

Ted Boyse serves as the Division Chief for Duke Radiology’s Community Division, Medical Director for Imaging Services at Duke Raleigh Hospital, and a musculoskeletal radiologist in the Division of Musculoskeletal Radiology. Dr. Boyse is committed to bringing Duke Health to the community and has led the Department of Radiology’s expansion of services in Wake County. He has also led numerous imaging quality improvement initiatives focused on efficiency.Dr. Boyse is honored to present to the department.

Surgery in the American Civil War

February 8, 2018 7:30 a.m. Duke North Room 2002

This lecture explores the experiences of the more than 12,000 surgeons who served both sides in the American Civil War.It considers the reasons for greater Union success in caring for and curing their patients, and the many difficulties and triumphs of the men who served in this challenging medical environment.

Margaret Humphreys, MD, PhD

Professor of Medicine and History Duke University & School of Medicine

Margaret Humphreys is the Josiah Charles Trent Professor in the History of Medicine at Duke University. She received her PhD in the History of Science (1983) and MD (1987) from Harvard University. She is the author of Yellow Fever and the South (Rutgers, 1992); Malaria: Poverty, Race and Public Health in the United States (Johns Hopkins, 2001); Intensely Human: The Health of the Black Soldier in American Civil War (2008); and Marrow of Tragedy: The Health Crisis of the American Civil War (2013). She teaches the history of medicine, public health, global health, food, and biology to undergraduates at Duke University, and is editor emeritus of the Journal of the History of Medicine. (For more information, see www.mehumphreys.com.)

Assessment of Liver Directed Interventional Oncology Therapy

February 15, 2018 7:30 a.m. Duke North Room 2002

Knowledge of post-treatment appearance of HCC using interventional oncology therapy is imperative to assess response but is often challenging. During this talk, Dr. Miller will discuss the imaging findings following ablation (RFA), and focus especially on transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) and radioembolization. The limitations of traditional size (RECIST) criteria and the value of necrosis and diffusion weighted imaging will be discussed.

Frank Miller, MD

Professor of Radiology, Northwestern Medicine – Chicago, IL

Dr. Frank Miller is the Lee F. Rogers MD Endowed Professor of Medical Education at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and the Igor Laufer Visiting Professor for the Society of Abdominal Radiology. He is chief of the body imaging section, fellowship director, and medical director of MRat Northwestern Memorial Hospital. He is a fellow of the ACR, SCBT-MR, and Society of Abdominal Radiology. His main research interests relate to body MR especially pancreatic and hepatobiliary imaging and oncologic imaging. He is interested in cutting-edge technology including DWI and MR elastography, for which he received the NMFF Clinical Innovation Award. He has written over 200 papers and chapters and coauthored two books on GI and GU radiology. He has received a teacher of the year award from the residents and 3 RSNA honored educator awards and trained over 100 fellows.

The Cost of Being Black: The Influence of Race on Health Disparities

February 22, 2018 7:30 a.m. Duke North Room 2002

Health disparities, as it pertains to race, has been identified in nearly every disease process ranging from asthma to heart disease.1,2 Research suggests that these disparities may be linked to patient determinants such as limited resources associated with socioeconomic status and poor health care education, but others point to a more disturbing condition within the medical community itself.3 That the presence of implicit and explicit bias within hospital walls contributes to the morbidity and mortality of the minority population.4 It is hoped that by discussing the history of race in medicine and acknowledging the continued impact of bias that we will be able to eliminate disparities for future generations through better education of staff delivering care. 1.Kaiser Family Foundation: Key Facts on Race, Ethnicity and Medical Care, 19992.Graham G. (2015). Disparities in Cardiovascular Disease Risk in the United States. Curr Cardiol Rev. 2015 Aug; 11(3): 238–245. 3.Douglas-Hall, A.; Chau, M.; & Koball, H. (2006). Basic facts about low-income children: Birth to age 18. New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. 4.Blaire I (2011). Unconscious (Implicit) Bias and Health Disparities: Where Do We Go from Here? Perm J. 2011 Spring; 15(2): 71–78.

Ebony Hilton, MD

Assistant Professor of Anesthesia Medical University of South Carolina – Charleston, SC

Dr. Ebony Jade Hilton received her MD from the Medical University of South Carolina. She remained at MUSC for her Residency in Anesthesia and a Fellowship in Critical Care Medicine. In 2013, she was hired as the first African American Female Anesthesiologist at MUSC. Her passions have centered on exploring health disparities, particularly as it pertains to race, and bridging the gap between physicians and the communities they serve. Her efforts have been recognized by the National Medical Association and the National Minority Quality Forum as one of the top 40 under 40 Leaders in Health Care award recipients. In addition to pioneering medicine, Dr. Hilton is a children’s book author of the Ava Series, a public speaker and community activist.

Liver Fat Quantification Episode II - Translation of the Tech

March 15, 2018 7:30 a.m. Duke North Room 2002

Techniques for quantifying liver fat are becoming widely available, but clinically meaningful uses for this technology are still evolving. While not as helpful as once hoped for the diagnosis of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), liver fat quantification is a useful tool for assessing response to therapy in clinical trials, and this role may translate to clinical practice. Furthermore, reaching beyond simple fat quantification to characterizing the types of fatty acids in the body may provide deeper insight into an individual’s metabolic state.

Mustafa R. Bashir, MD

Associate Professor of Radiology, Director - MRI, Director - Center for Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Abdominal Imaging, Department of Radiology, Duke University, Durham, NC

Mustafa Bashir, MD, is an Associate Professor of Radiology, Director of MRI for Duke University Health System, and Medical Director for the Center for Advanced Magnetic Resonance Development. He is the author of more than five peer-reviewed publications. His primary research interests are in imaging related to liver metabolism and liver cancer, as well as technical developments in MRI. More important than any of those things, he is the father of four wonderful children.

Morbidity & Mortality

March 22, 2018 7:30 a.m. Duke North Room 2002

Department of Radiology Morbidity & Mortality, moderated by Tracy A. Jaffe, M.D.

Tracy A. Jaffe, M.D.

Associate Professor of Radiology, Division Chief, Abdominal Imaging, Vice Chair of Safety and Quality, Department of Radiology, Duke University, Durham, NC

Tracy Jaffe currently serves as Vice Chair of Quality and Safety in the Department of Radiology. She is an Associate Professor with Tenure, and has been a clinical faculty member at Duke since completing her fellowship in Abdominal Imaging in 2002.  She served as the Abdominal Imaging Fellowship Director from 2006 – 2012, and since 2012 has served as the Abdominal Imaging Division Chief.  Her research interests include inflammatory bowel disease and CT dose reduction. She is a member of the Duke Health System Pharmacy and Medication Management Committee and the Duke University Hospital Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee. She is a Fellow of the Society of Abdominal Radiology.

TBD

March 29, 2018 7:30 a.m. Duke North Room 2002
Christopher D. Lascola, MD, PhD.

Assistant Professor of Radiology, Assistant Professor of Neurobiology, Director, Molecular Neuroimaging Laboratory. Department Of Radiology, Duke University, Durham, NC

Morbidity and Mortality

April 12, 2018 7:30 a.m. Duke North Room 2002

Department of Radiology Morbidity & Mortality, moderated by Tracy A. Jaffe, M.D.

Tracy A. Jaffe, MD

Associate Professor of Radiology, Division Chief, Abdominal Imaging, Vice Chair of Safety and Quality, Department of Radiology, Duke University, Durham, NC

Tracy Jaffe currently serves as Vice Chair of Quality and Safety in the Department of Radiology. She is an Associate Professor with Tenure, and has been a clinical faculty member at Duke since completing her fellowship in Abdominal Imaging in 2002.  She served as the Abdominal Imaging Fellowship Director from 2006 – 2012, and since 2012 has served as the Abdominal Imaging Division Chief.  Her research interests include inflammatory bowel disease and CT dose reduction. She is a member of the Duke Health System Pharmacy and Medication Management Committee and the Duke University Hospital Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee. She is a Fellow of the Society of Abdominal Radiology.

TBD

April 19, 2018 7:30 a.m. Duke North Room 2002
Waleska M. Pabon-Ramos, MD, MPH

Assistant Professor of Radiology, Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, Duke University, Durham, NC

TBD

May 10, 2018 7:30 a.m. Duke North Room 2002
Lars J. Grimm, MD, MHS

Assistant Professor of Radiology, Breast Imaging, Department of Radiology, Duke University, Durham, NC

TBD

May 17, 2018 7:30 a.m. Duke North Room 2002
Rajan T. Gupta, MD

Associate Professor of Radiology, Assistant Professor of Surgery, Director - Abdominal Imaging Fellowship Program, Director - Duke Radiology Continuing Medical Education. Division of Abdominal Imaging, Department of Radiology, Duke University, Durham, NC

3/2 Presentations

May 24, 2018 7:30 a.m. Duke North Room 2002

3/2 Presentations

TBD

3/2 Presentations

May 31, 2018 7:30 a.m. Duke North Room 2002

3/2 Presentations

TBD

Prepless MR Colonography for Colorectal Cancer Screening: Work in Progress

June 14, 2018 7:30 a.m. Duke North Room 2002

The talk will include general information about colorectal cancer screening and available screening options. The focus of the talk will be on recent work in developing prepless MR colonography as a screening test for colorectal cancer.

Courtney Coursey Moreno, MD

Associate Professor of Radiology Emory University – Atlanta, GA

Dr. Courtney Coursey Moreno completed her Radiology Residency and Fellowship inAbdominal Imaging at Duke University School of Medicine receiving the Fellows Teaching Award during her fellowship year. Since completion of her training, she has worked in the Emory Healthcare System and is the current Director of Ultrasound in the Division of Radiology. She has served on several professional committees and panels in Radiology including the ACR Appropriateness Criteria Committees for GI and GU Imaging and the Society of Abdominal Radiology Rectal Cancel Disease Focus Panel. To date, she has written over 70 publications, review articles, and book chapters and co-authored a book on GI Radiology.Her research interests include CT dose optimization and MRcolonography as a screening test for colorectal cancer.

3/2 Presentations

June 21, 2018 7:30 a.m. Duke North Room 2002

3/2 Presentations

TBD

3/2 Presentations

June 28, 2018 7:30 a.m. Duke North Room 2002

3/2 Presentations

TBD