Neuroradiology

Overview

The Neuroradiology Section at the Duke University Medical Center consists of ten diagnostic neuroradiologists. Our clinical service covers brain, spine and neck imaging for adult and pediatric patients. We also have a busy CT-guided spine intervention practice run by six faculty members at two sites.

We have close collaboration with the Departments of Neurology, Neurological Surgery, Pediatrics, Otolaryngology, and Radiation Oncology which provides a stimulating collegial atmosphere through daily interactions during readout sessions, conferences, and Grand Rounds.

Special expertise and research interests include Head and Neck Imaging, Stroke Imaging, Pediatric Neuroradiology, Novel MRI techniques, Functional Neuroradiology, Spine Diagnosis and Intervention, and Neurodiagnostic and Interventional Angiography.

 

Faculty

Timothy J. Amrhein, M.D.
  • Assistant Professor of Radiology
Daniel P. Barboriak, M.D.
  • Vice Chair, Academic Affairs
  • Director of Clinical Research Unit
  • Professor of Radiology
  • Professor of Pediatrics
James Eastwood, M.D.
  • Associate Professor of Radiology
  • Director, Neuroradiology Fellowship Training Program
David S. Enterline, M.D., FACR
  • Associate Professor of Radiology
  • Division Chief, Neuroradiology
Marc A. Finkel, M.D.
  • Assistant Consulting Professor
Linda Gray-Leithe, M.D.
  • Associate Professor of Radiology
Jenny K. Hoang, MBBS
  • Associate Professor of Radiology
  • Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology
  • Faculty Medical Physics Department
Peter G. Kranz, M.D.
  • Assistant Professor of Radiology
Christopher D. Lascola, M.D., Ph.D.
  • Assistant Professor of Radiology
  • Assistant Professor of Neurobiology
  • Director, Molecular Neuroimaging Laboratory
Michael Malinzak, M.D., Ph.D.
  • Medical Instructor
Jeffrey R. Petrella, M.D.
  • Professor of Radiology
James M. Provenzale, M.D., FACR
  • Professor of Radiology
Christopher J. Roth, M.D.
  • Assistant Professor of Radiology
  • Vice Chair, Information Technology and Clinical Informatics
  • Director of Imaging Informatics Strategy, Duke Health
Robert C. Vogler, M.D.
  • Assistant Consulting Professor of Radiology

Fellowship

 Research  • Teaching  • Vacation  • Application

Overview

The Duke Neuroradiology Training Program is currently approved for 8 ACGME-approved fellows. Fellows work with a faculty of 10 full-time fellowship-trained diagnostic neuroradiologists and 3 neuro-interventionalists (1 radiologist and 2 neurosurgeons.) The Duke Neuoradiology fellowship program offers training in adult and pediatric cross-sectional CT and MR, neurovascular angiography, and spine interventional procedures.

There are two main training pathways that fellows may undertake at Duke. The pathway that most fellows will undertake is a traditional, rigorous, one-year training program covering all facets of clinical Neuroradiology. The other pathway is a two-year program of study designed to train future academic neuroradiologists. This second pathway combines a year of research training together with a year of clinical training in Neuroradiology. Fellows undertaking the two-year program of study receive mentored experience in neuroradiology research, along with full training in clinical Neuroradiology.

Many fellowship applicants wish to be considered only for the one-year program. However, it is helpful for interested applicants to identify themselves as potential candidates for the two-year program as early as possible in the application process.

Clinical and Research Work Enviroment

The Duke Neuroradiology section provides clinical service at two facilities: Duke University Medical Center and the Durham VA Medical Center, which is located across the street from Duke Medical Center. (For details of the Duke Medical Center Radiology clinical equipment.) There are two dedicated neurovascular angiography units at Duke Medical Center. One of these units contains a Philips Integris rotating isotropic C-arm neuroangiography table. The other neurovascular room has state-of-the-art bi-plane fluoroscopy capability. Imaging capabilities at the Durham VA Medical Center include a 1.5T Philips Integra MR scanner with perfusion and tensor diffusion capabilities, two state-of-the-art CT scanners and two angiography suites (one of which is a dedicated neuroangiography system).

Duke Medical Center has 2 research MR scanners (one 1.5T and one 3T ) in close proximity to the clinical scanners. These scanners are located in the Brain Imaging and Analysis Center (BIAC), which operates in close affiliation with the Neuroradiology division. The BIAC is designed primarily for development of projects using brain activation studies, but also serves as the site for many projects involving other forms of advanced MR imaging.

The Duke Neuroradiology faculty has a strong research interest in MR diffusion imaging, MR perfusion imaging, MR brain activation studies, DCE-MRI of the neck, CT angiography and CT perfusion imaging. Duke Neuroradiology faculty and fellows have enjoyed good success in obtaining awards provided by national Radiology societies.

Goals of the Duke Neuroradiology Training Program

The Duke Neuroradiology training program is designed to train fellows in the diagnostic and interventional neuroradiologic procedures standardly used by practicing neuroradiologists. The program has a number of goals for trainees, which are as follows:

  • To teach modern diagnostic techniques of MR and CT imaging of the brain and spine.
  • To teach safe and effective diagnostic techniques of angiography of the brain and spine.
  • To teach safe and effective diagnostic techniques of myelography of the spine and brain cisternography.
  • To teach safe and effective diagnostic techniques of spinal interventional procedures, including CT-guided biopsy, spinal nerve root blocks, and discography.

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Instruction during Neuroradiology Rotations

  • CT imaging- Fellows are assigned to CT interpretation on a weekly basis. Duties include interpretation of CT imaging studies and learning to appropriately protocol CT examinations. These duties are performed under the guidance of Neuroradiology staff, who review CT examinations with fellows during film interpretation sessions.
  • MR imaging- Fellows are assigned to MR interpretation on a weekly basis. Duties include interpretation of MR imaging studies and learning to appropriately protocol MR examinations. These duties are performed under the guidance of Neuroradiology staff, who review MR examinations with fellows during film interpretation sessions.
  • Angiography- Fellows are assigned to angiography on a weekly basis. Duties include performance of angiography of brain and spine and interpretation of angiography findings. These duties are performed under the guidance of Neuroradiology staff, who perform angiography with fellows and review angiography during film interpretation sessions.
  • Myelography/Cisternography – Fellows are assigned to myelography/cisternography on a weekly basis. Duties include performance of myelograms and cisternograms and interpretation of study findings. These duties are performed under the guidance of Neuroradiology staff, who perform procedures with fellows and review studies during film interpretation sessions.
  • Spine Interventional Procedures- Fellows are assigned to spinal interventional procedures on a weekly basis. Duties include performance of nerve root blocks, epidural blocks and spine biopsies and interpretation of study findings. These duties are performed under the guidance of Neuroradiology staff, who perform procedures with fellows and review studies during film interpretation sessions.

Evaluation of Fellows’ and Faculty Performance
Fellow evaluations: Fellows are provided with written evaluation of their performance three times during the program. The faculty performs evaluations of the fellows’ performance at 3, 7 and 12 months.

Anonymous evaluations by the fellows of the program and faculty are received once per year at the end of the 12-month training program. Faculty are evaluated using a numerical scoring system on a wide variety of clinical, teaching and research skills.

Fellows’ Vacation and Leave Policy

Fellows have 15 days of vacation and that up to 5 meeting days are also provided, which includes time spent at national Radiology meetings. The program in neuroradiology follows the guidelines of the American Board of Radiology for Neuroradiology training programs with regard to leave time. Specifically, fellows are permitted to take up to 30 work days (6 weeks) total leave from the 12 month training program. The 30 work days including vacation time, personal illness, and parental leave. Additional leave may be taken in certain circumstances (e.g., eligible parental leave as mandated by the Family Leave Act), though time taken beyond 30 days must be made up prior to completion of the program.

Thank you for your inquiry regarding the Neuroradiology Fellowship. You may submit your application electronically to willi139@mc.duke.edu or mail to Dr. James Eastwood to the address listed below. Letters of recommendation may also be submitted electronically but original must be sent to Dr. Eastwood.

Your completed application should include:

  • Completed application form
  • CV
  • Personal statement
  • USMLE Transcripts
  • 3 letters of recommendation (1 must be from your Program Director or Chairman)
  • Recent photo

**The Medical School Dean’s Letter or proof of graduation from medical school are not required by our program.

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Program Director:

For more information please contact:

James D. Eastwood, M.D.
Telephone: (919) 684-7406
Babbie Williams
Program Coordinator
Telephone: (919) 684-7406     Fax: (919) 684-7157
E-mail: willi139@dm.duke.edu

For correspondence, please use the following:

Mailing Address:
Duke University Medical Center
Department of Radiology
Division of Neuroradiology
Box 3808
Durham, NC 27710
Physical Address:
Duke University Medical Center
Department of Radiology
Division of Neuroradiology
2301 Erwin Road, Room 1547
Durham, NC 27710